Practice Makes Perfect for Nest-Building Weavers

October 4, 2011 by  
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It has long been assumed that the nest building skills of birds are instinctive, but new research has revealed that building a nest could very well be a learned skill. Following and filming the activities of male Southern Masked Weavers in Botswana over a period of three months, researchers noted that not all nests are created equal. As the name of the bird suggests, Southern Masked Weavers use a weaving technique when constructing their nests from local grasses. However, the method of nest building varied between birds with some weaving from left to right and others weaving from right to left. It was also noted that they appeared to learn from their mistakes, and while a bird may regularly drop blades of grass when it first starts its nest building process, it soon learns to adjust its technique to prevent this.

The brightly colored African bird was chosen as the test subject for the study for a number of reasons. Their complex nests which hang from trees either as single units or multiple intertwined condominiums are seen as evidence of above average intelligence. Also, a single bird will build several nests in a season, allowing the research team to note the differences in nests built by the same bird.

Working with scientists from Botswana, researchers from the universities of St Andrews, Edinburgh and Glasgow noted that the fact that the Southern Masked Weaver birds displayed marked variations in their approach to nest building reveals that they may learn from experience. At this point, however, it is not clear whether they have the mental capacity to learn, or their improvement in skills can be attributed to repetition of a task. Researchers also pointed out that observing this behavior in one bird species does not imply that it would apply to all birds. One of the scientists taking part in the study, Dr. Patrick Walsh of Edinburgh University’s School of Biological Sciences, noted that if birds built their nests instinctively according to a genetic template, it would follow that all birds would build all their nests in the same way every time, but this has not been the case. Summing it up nicely, Dr. Walsh was reported as saying: “Even for birds, practice makes perfect.”

Garden Birds

February 9, 2009 by  
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Garden birds come in large varieties and knowing a bit more about them will make watching them that much more interesting. To identify garden birds in your area use a region specific garden bird guide. For example if you are living in Britain, use a British bird field guide.

The most common garden birds you will find are of the passerine group. Passerines are perching birds and song birds which have three toes pointing forward and one pointing back. Passerines that are commonly seen in gardens include sparrows, thrushes, mynahs, crows, wagtails, chaffinches, goldfinches, magpies, starlings, bulbuls, weavers and more. Weaver’s nests are often easily spotted hanging from the outer branches of trees. It is fascinating to watch the male hard at work building his nest. Thrushes can often be seen darting around under bushes in search of insects. Beware of magpies as they are known as the kleptomaniacs of the avian world. Details on specific garden bird species can be found in a good field guide.

The other group of garden birds are the non-passerines. These are non-perching birds. Non-passerines that may be spotted in the garden are pigeons, doves, woodpeckers, hoopoes, parrot species, swifts, owls, cuckoos, lapwings, various smaller birds of prey and so on. Obviously the size of your property will determine the types of garden birds that will be seen. Doves and pigeons will probably be the most likely species of non-passerine that you will see as they often frequent garden bird feeders.

Garden birds can be enticed to your garden by a ready supply of food, bearing in mind that different species have different preferences. Likewise, many bird feeders are available to attract various types of birds, and a bird bath is always a welcome addition to a garden. By providing such accessories you will open up a delightful opportunities to view and identify birds in your own garden.