Keeping a Pet Caique

April 26, 2011 by  
Filed under Pet Birds

The Caique is known by a variety of names such as the Seven Color Parrot, Yellow Thighed Caique, Black Headed Caique and the Dancing Parrot. There are, however, two Caiques, namely the Black Headed Caique (Pionites melanocephala) and the White Bellied Caique (Pionites leucogaster). Over the years they have slowly become more popular as pets, as they are known for their playful personalities, curiosity and entertaining talents. Their wonderful coloring is another beautiful feature that they offer, and more bird owners are starting to warm up to the Caique as a pet bird.

Growing to a length of approximately nine to ten inches, the Caique is a relatively small parrot. The Black Headed Caique has black plumage on its head, with green just below the eyes and orange cheeks. Green plumage covers the upper tail feathers and wings, while its belly is beige, with grey coloring to its beak and legs. The White Headed Caiques feature pink legs, yellow and orange head plumage, white bellies and green on the tails and wings. They can live an estimated twenty years and are very energetic.

Caique parrots crave the attention of owners, so owners need to be very interactive with them. These clever little parrots are able to quickly pick up and mimic tunes whistled to them. They do have the ability to talk, and speak in tiny high pitched voices. They need a lot of activities and toys to keep them stimulated, as they bunny hop, swing and roll to keep themselves entertained. Bells, ropes, swings and hoops are recommended toys for Caiques, as well as toys they can destroy by chewing and biting. They are able to adapt to being alone in a cage, or with a mate, but do not do well in a cage with other bird species, as they are known to become aggressive towards them and can deliver a harsh bite when provoked.

Nutrition wise, the Caique can be fed the same as any other pet parrots, supplemented with fresh fruit and vegetables. If bird owners are searching for a pet bird that they can cuddle, love and play with, the Caique is the ideal bird, as it is interactive, excitable and always ready for attention and love.

Mid-South Exotic Bird Fair 2009

November 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Events

Exotic bird breeders and avian experts will be attending the Mid-South Exotic Bird Fair in Memphis, on 28 and 29 November 2009. A host of exotic birds will be on display, and visitors to the bird fair will be able to ask for advice and gain knowledge in regard to the care and nutrition of these wonderful birds. Visitors will be able to purchase nutritional products, toys, bird cages and exotic birds such as finches, cockatoos, African greys and macaws.

To find out more about the fair and its exhibitors, contact organizers on 901-603-9927 or visit the bird shows website at www.birdshows.com.

Date: 28 – 29 November 2009
Venue: S.W. Tennessee Community College
City: Memphis, Tennessee
Country: United States of America

Chester County Bird Show 2009

October 9, 2009 by  
Filed under Events

There will be fun and excitement at the 21st Annual Chester County Bird Show and Mart, on the 31st of October 2009, from 10am to 5pm. Not only will there be birds of all colors and sizes on display, but special arrangements have been made for children, such as Halloween candy at the vendors’ stalls. Bird owners will also be able to purchase a variety of bird related items from the show, as vendors will be showcasing everything from toys to cages.

For more information in regard to the Chester County Bird Show, visit the official website at http://www.ccbirdclub.com/index_files/2009ShowPage/index.htm

Date: 31 October 2009
Venue: School at Church Farm
City: Exton
Country: United States of America

The Long Island Parrot Society’s Parrot Expo 2009

July 15, 2009 by  
Filed under Events

Parrot lovers will enjoy The Long Island Parrot Society’s Parrot Expo 2009, as colorful birds such as macaws, lovebirds and budgies will be stealing the show. The expo will be focusing on the care of birds with many avian and veterinarian experts hosting workshops and talks. The Vendor Room will again be filled with stalls featuring the latest products in nutrition, cages, toys and much more. Bird lovers should not miss out on this paradise for parrots.

The Long Island Parrot Society website offers comprehensive information on the society, the expo and future events at www.liparrots.org.

Date: 3 October 2009
Venue: Freeport Recreation Centre
City: Freeport, New York
Country: United States of America

Bird Safety

February 9, 2009 by  
Filed under

Due to the adventurous nature of birds it is essential to ensure that their environment is safe.

The first safety precautions to consider are to do with the bird’s immediate environment – its cage. The spacing between the bars of a bird cage must be narrow so that your bird will not get its head stuck. Bars that are of a small diameter are easily bent and can make the gaps larger and less safe. There are a variety of feeding and watering bowls available and these must be selected carefully with the bird’s safety in mind. It is important to use the bowls designed for the holders as gaps will provide opportunity for toes to get stuck. Be sure to secure “guillotine”; type cage doors as some birds may try to lift these and get their heads caught. Look out for cages made of materials that may contain poisonous zinc or brass. Spring loaded latches can also be dangerous for toes and beaks.

Safety in feeding is another aspect to look at. Foods that are bought in bulk and then repackaged are not a good idea as they may be contaminated. Rather purchase food in the packaging of the manufacturer, even if it is slightly more expensive.

Many people recommend that a bird’s wings be clipped so as to prevent it from flying into trouble around the house. If your bird is permitted to leave its cage, it is vital to bird-proof your home for your bird’s safety, and to always know where it is. Many things around the house may prove toxic to birds, to name a few: crayons, various household cleaners, insecticides, lead-based paint, nicotine and table salt. It is also advisable not to let the bird out the cage when cooking or cleaning, as it may consume the wrong things or get burnt on ovens and stoves. Resist the desire to have your bird sleep with you, as sadly, many people have awoken to find their birds have been crushed.

Certain toys can also compromise your bird’s safety. Toys made from fabric may have threads in which the bird may tangle his/her feet or neck. Key rings are often used to attach hanging toys to the cage, however alternatives would be better as beaks, tongues and toes can get caught in these. Rope toys with loose threads may also entangle your bird.

The best thing to do is to carefully watch your bird’s activities around its cage and the external environment and try to predict any possible dangers to your bird’s safety. Rather safe than sorry!