Fascinating Facts about Rhinoceros Hornbills

November 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Features

The rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros) is a most unusual looking bird found primarily in the rain forests of Sumatra, Borneo, Java, Singapore, the Malay Peninsula and southern Thailand. Its large yellow-orange hornlike casque, curving upward from between its eyes as an extension of its beak, makes it immediately clear why this species of hornbill is associated with a rhinoceros. As one of the largest hornbills, adults weigh up to 3kg and are typically between 91 and 122 cm long. They have a lifespan of thirty-five years or more in captivity and there is little difference in appearance between the male and female of the species, other than the male having orange or red irises, and the female’s irises being whitish in color.

While the casque may be shaded in orange and yellow, the beak of the rhinoceros hornbill is mostly white. When in flight, the rhinoceros hornbill’s black wings curve around gracefully towards its head, while it’s white tail feathers with a perfect semi-circle of black spreads out like a fan. As omnivores, these fascinating birds eat fruit, insects, rodents, small reptiles and even smaller birds.

During the breeding period the female rhinoceros hornbill is completely dependent on her mate as she incubates the eggs and starts raising their chicks. Upon finding a suitable cavity in a tree trunk, the female lays one or two eggs while the male collects mud which the pair will mix with food and feces to close up the entrance to the nest. They leave a small hole in the newly made wall for the male to pass food through for the female and later for the chicks. The female also defecates through the hole to avoid soiling the nesting cavity. Around thirty days after the eggs hatch the female breaks through the wall and seals it behind her. Both parents continue feeding the chicks through a small hole until they are able to break through the wall on their own, at which point they are ready to fly.

Rhinoceros hornbills are not considered to be endangered at present, however deforestation is a problem which could impact populations in the wild in the future. Moreover, these birds are hunted as food, and ornaments are made out of their casques. Members of the public can play a part in conserving rhinoceros hornbills and other animals by refusing to buy ornaments or other products made from their body parts.

Asian Bird Fair 2010

August 11, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

Bird watching groups from various countries, such as China, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines and Malaysia, was working together to host the first Asian Bird Fair on the 24th and 25th of September 2010. The fair will offer lectures and talks by well known delegates, and also take visitors on fascinating bird watching expeditions. It is a unique opportunity for bird watchers to get together and explore the world of birds locally and internationally.

Visit the Birdwatch website at http://www.birdwatch.ph/index.html for more information in regard to lectures, bird watching and the fair schedule.

Date: 24 – 25 September 2010
Venue: Waterfront Insular Hotel Davao
City: Davao
Country: Philippines

Spectacular Species at Jurong BirdPark

June 17, 2008 by  
Filed under Features

Bird lovers looking for something new to try might consider visiting the beautiful and exciting country of Singapore. This colorful country is home to the Jurong BirdPark, a carefully landscaped park that spans an area of 202 000 square meters. The park is situated in the Jurong district on the western slope of Jurong Hill and is a delight to almost all bird enthusiasts who venture here.

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