Enjoy a Family Outing at Tropical Birdland

February 1, 2015 by  
Filed under Features

Located in the picturesque village of Desford, near Leicester in England, Tropical Birdland is home to more than 250 birds, including a collection of free-flying parrots from all over the world. Visitors will have the opportunity to stroll at leisure through the main walk-through aviary, view newly hatched or hatching chicks, interact with birds on Parrot Path, and take a walk on the wild side along the Woodland Walk, with the possibility of seeing kingfishers, jays, woodpeckers and squirrels among the trees and shrubs.

Tropical Birdland opened to the public in 1984, when Richard Hopper decided to turn his hobby into a business. With breeding of endangered species as one of the park’s main goals, aviaries were built and rare species were added to the growing collection of birds housed at the facilities. In 1992, Hopper started training birds for free flight, with his very first bird, a blue and gold macaw named Jackie, being the first to take flight. Today, several parrots and macaws spend their days out in the open with the option of free flight, returning to their sleeping quarters each night.

Among the rare and unusual birds at Tropical Birdland is a pair of highly endangered hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). Found only in the wetlands of the Pantanal – the world’s largest tropical wetland area found in Brazil, Bolivia and Paraquay – and some areas of the Amazon jungle in Brazil, this spectacularly beautiful species is the largest, and quite likely the strongest, parrot species in the world. As with many bird species around the world, their continued existence in the wild is threatened by deforestation as humans turn their habitat into farmland.

Other exotic birds housed at Tropical Birdland include the blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna), the green-winged macaw (Ara chloroptera), the bare-eyed cockatoo (Cacatua sanguinea), the Galah cockatoo (Eolophus roseicapillus), and the black-headed caique (Pionites melanocephala), as well as the kea parrot (Nestor notabilis) and the snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus).

Tropical Birdland also features a restaurant, picnic area and play park, making it the perfect venue for a family outing in the English countryside.

Enjoy a Day at Birdworld in Surrey

June 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Features

Located on 26 acres in Surrey’s Alice Holt Forest, Birdworld offers the perfect setting for a family outing. As one of the largest bird parks in England, Birdworld is home to an extensive collection of bird species, housed in conditions which keep the birds happy while allowing visitors to view them up close. In addition to viewing the birds, which include everything from the tiniest Sunbird to the impressive Maribou stork, the park offers a daily program of events and activities that will keep the family busy all day.

Birdworld includes the Jenny Wren Farm with a wide range of domestic animals such as goats, pigs, ponies, chickens and a cow which visitors can pet. The pet shop at the farm has rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, ferrets, chipmunks, finches, rats and poultry. If the kids manage to persuade mom and dad that they really will look after one of these cute little creatures, the pet shop has all the housing, bedding and other paraphernalia needed to take the new member of the family home. Bird lovers will find that finches make good pets, but need to keep in mind that while they are not demanding on their owner’s time, they do need a mate, so be prepared to get two.

Daily events at Birdworld include feeding the Humboldt Penguins twice a day (11am and 3:30 pm). The keepers doing the feeding will offer interesting facts on these comical birds as they dive into the glass-sided pool for their food. Depending on weather conditions, each day between Easter and the end of October, the park has an outdoor flying display featuring a range of birds, including owls, kookaburras and parrots. The indoor Heron Theater Show stars a range of birds displaying their natural behavior while the presenter details a number of fascinating facts about these indigenous birds. Visitors can join the keepers as they feed the Owls and Bird of Prey, all the while sharing interesting facts about the birds and answering questions. The Safari Road Train takes visitors to see some of Birdworld’s larger inhabitants, including Emus, Cranes, Storks and Ostriches. Be sure to ask about the conservation projects Birdworld is involved in.

With so much to do at Birdworld, plan to spend the day at the park. You may want to try and include some of the special events, such as Art in the Park, Teddy Bear’s Picnic, or Mini Beast Safari Day, so be sure to check in with Birdworld on what’s happening when you make your plans to visit.

Osprey History in the Making

April 2, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

The Kielder Water and Forest Park is located in England. It is not only home to the country’s biggest forest areas, but the largest man-made lake to be found in northern Europe. Its remote location and breathtaking natural landscapes make the park a favorite amongst artists, hiking enthusiasts and cyclists. The park is also the perfect family escape. Animals and bird life play a vital role in the park, and recently the Kielder Water and Forest Park has taken on a conservation challenge that might just make history.

The arrival of a breeding pair of ospreys last year was an exciting event for the staff and rangers at the Kielder Water and Forest Park. It might not sound like a major event, but their sighting in the park marked the return of these magnificent birds to the Northumberland area in more than two hundred years. Ospreys are large raptors that feed on fish and are able to adapt to a variety of habitats, as long as there is water and enough food supply. Even though last year’s visitors did not nest in the park, it is hoped that they will return to the park this year, where a nesting platform will be waiting for them.

Ospreys are known to be very loyal to their partners, and more than often return to a nesting site. Rangers believe that by enticing a breeding pair to nest within the park, they will ensure the return of the birds and their young, and in future lure more breeding pairs to the park. The Kielder Water and Forest Reserve is the ideal location for ospreys, as the lake is able to provide them with both water and ample food supply. The park has now set up a nesting platform in a secret location that is situated deep within the isolation of the forest, and stands at a height of 18.2 meters. To capture the event, and allow visitors to be a part of the excitement, the park has installed CCTV cameras on the platform. This will allow the public to be a part of the excitement without any direct human interference. With all the preparations made, the Forestry Department and the Kielder Water and Forest Park will be waiting patiently to see the first signs of hope; namely the return of the male to scout for nesting sites.

Black Grouse Saved from Extinction

March 26, 2008 by  
Filed under Features

The Black Grouse appears on the IUCN Red List of endangered species and was considered to be one of the bird species most likely to become extinct. However, through the dedicated efforts of conservation groups over the past two decades, the dramatic decline of this rare bird has not only been halted, but turned around, and Black Grouse numbers in the northern Pennines are slowly rising.

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