Golden Pheasants – Elegant and Exotic

January 10, 2015 by  
Filed under Features

Indigenous to the mountains of central China, Golden Pheasants (Chrysolophus pictus) are spectacularly beautiful birds that are so well adapted to living in captivity they have become popular pets in many countries far from their original habitat. Some researchers are of the opinion that the Golden Pheasant was likely the first species of pheasant brought into North America in the mid-1700s, and they have formed several feral populations in parts of the United Kingdom.

The Golden Pheasant and Lady Amherst Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) are both Ruffed Pheasants, so named for the ruff the male spreads around his face and neck as part of his courtship ritual. The female Golden Pheasant is brown in color with dark rippled bars running from her head down her body and wings, while her face, throat and rump are buff. The male, on the other hand, is one of the most colorful birds around, with a silky-golden crest, tinged with red at the tips. Its face, chin, throat and sides of its neck are a rusty tan color, while its orbital skin and wattles are yellow. The ruff of the Golden Pheasant is light orange, with a bluish-black border on each feather. The green upper back of the bird contrasts beautifully with its golden-yellow back and rump, while its scarlet breast blends into a light chestnut color on its flanks and underparts. Its tertiary wing feathers are blue, with dark red scapulars, while its central tail feathers are black with buff spots and the tip of its tail being buff.

Although they are brightly colored, they are not always easy to spot in their natural habitat of dense forest, so not much is known about their habits in the wild. What is known is that they forage on the ground, eating grain, leaves and invertebrates, and they can fly short distances, roosting in trees at night.

As they are compatible with other types of birds (but not always with other pheasant species), Golden Pheasants can be kept in an environment with waterfowl, peafowl, doves, pigeons and other birds. They are very hardy, breed easily in captivity and the chicks are easy to raise. As such, Golden Pheasants are a good choice for first-time pheasant owners and a firm favorite among veteran bird keepers.

What is that bird talking about?

February 3, 2014 by  
Filed under Pet Birds

“I tried to discover, in the rumor of forests and waves, words that other men could not hear, and I pricked up my ears to listen to the revelation of their harmony.” Gustave Flaubert

Most of us have been conditioned to consider bird’s chirping, singing, or squawking as something like noise. How sad for us. Although a great listener of humans and four legged animals, I’ve been woefully ignorant of the rich discussions taking place in the trees. The most basic understanding of bird language would have enriched my experiences with birds both captive and free.

Soon after being given a Quaker parrot in the summer of 2013, a friend played Jon Young’s video about bird language for me. My eyes (and ears) were opened to a new dimension to the world around me. Just like humans and other mammals, birds make noise to communicate. Young’s insights allowed me to hear Dahlia’s comments and requests as clearly as I do my human friends.

Dahlia clucks, trills, squawks, whistles, sings, kisses, clicks, and purrs.

When I walk away or leave the room or car, she makes an unpleasant squawk. This is obviously an emotional response to something she does not like that serves as an alarm. When I walk back toward her or return to the room or car, she often trills, kisses, or coos.

When I stop singing in the shower, she often squawks. When I resume, she makes adorable sounds celebrating music and interaction as if it is a party.

After six months with Dahlia, our ability to communicate makes us friends and roommates rather than human and animal or worse, “owner” and “pet.” She is wonderful company, a fun dance partner, and great entertainment. She is also demanding with a strong sense of entitlement. It is one of the most intimate relationships I have ever had.

“When we are listened to, it creates us, makes us unfold and expand. Ideas actually begin to grow within us and come to life.” Brenda Ueland

By listening better and more often to Dahlia, I have helped her personality develop. Knowing I will respond to her needs, she is quick to make her desires known.

Playing music she likes encourages her dancing while enhancing her quality of life. Letting her take the lead in games we play makes her more than a toy.

“The activity of interpreting might be understood as listening for the ‘song beneath the words’.” Ronald Heifetz

One game we play is a version of Simon Says. Dahlia only initiates this when I am in the room but not engaging with her, which is telling. I hear a distinct whistle, rhuu-whoo-rhuu as she gets my attention. Recognizing the cue, I copy. She quickly gives me another, wheet wheooo, which I echo. Then wrhoo-ruh-wheet and my ready reply.

If I had not listened for meaning or “the song beneath the words”, I would have thought she was merely vocalizing. Playfully copying her led to another activity making us more like dance partners than jailor and jailbird. The connectedness we share as a result of varied interactions makes us both happier.

Having lived with so many animals over the years I am amazed at birds’ interest and ability for dance. My quaker parrot can’t stop moving to the music. It’s automatic. Maybe we should call song birds song and dance birds.

“An appreciative listener is always stimulating.” Agatha Christie

Some species, like mockingbirds, include “elements learned in the individual’s lifetime” in their songs. Researchers call this appropriation. Many scientists contend that song bird calls include grammatical structure. Undoubtedly, we will be learning about bird communication for years to come.

Birds use what they have to communicate much like humans do. Linguists will tell you that humans do not use all of the sounds our mouths can make. Some languages use more than others, but putting together all of the various sounds human language makes leaves some sounds completely unused. Birds however use all of the possible sounds due to their more limited apparatus.

Birds tell us they are content, happy, excited, angry, bored, and scared. Much of the emphasis on human/bird interaction is on how much human language they can learn or already know. But, if birds understand some of the words they use and understand words that they cannot say, our interaction with them, our relationships, would benefit from humans working on their listening and communicating skills.

Some things to consider:

Why you should listen to your bird

What your bird is telling you

What your bird wants you to know

What your bird is trying to tell you

You and your bird will be happier if you become a better listener.

Article submitted by: Lisa Kendall

Export And Capture Ban Passed As Law

November 10, 2008 by  
Filed under Features

A bill designed to ban the capture and export of wild parrots from Mexico was finally signed into law on October 14, 2008. The bill was introduced to the Mexican Senate a year ago in a report entitled: “The Illegal Parrot Trade in Mexico: A Comprehensive Assessment.” The report was presented by the Defenders of Wildlife and Teyeliz, A.C.

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The Lesser Known Pionus Parrots Make Marvelous Companions

April 23, 2008 by  
Filed under Pet Birds

Those who are familiar with Pionus Parrots will likely agree that they are one of the most underrated parrot species available. This medium-sized parrot originates from Central and South America and they make excellent pets.

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Senegal Parrots Make Fantastic Pets

April 2, 2008 by  
Filed under Pet Birds

If you are considering purchasing a parrot as a pet, you should consider the Senegal Parrot. They are perfect for owners who are living in flats, as they are not as noisy as most other parrots can be. Their unique personalities and entertaining characters make Senegal Parrots a great choice as family pets. Originating in West Africa, this popular >pet bird now finds itself in all corners of the earth in the homes of loving owners who adore them.

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