Birdsong Apps Pose Threat to Breeding

Birdsong Apps Pose Threat to Breeding

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Features

Bird watching as a hobby has been traced back to the late-18th century as portrayed in the works of English naturalists and ornithologists Gilbert White, Thomas Bewick and George Montagu…

Magnolia Warbler (Dendroica magnolia)

February 9, 2009 by  
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The Magnolia Warbler (Dendroica magnolia) was first recorded by Alexander Wilson in the 1800s. He had noticed a specimen in the magnolia trees while in Mississippi. The name ‘Magnolia’ has persisted through the years, although this bird is native to the northeastern regions of the United States. Wilson had at first used the English name [...]

Bird Calls and Sounds

February 9, 2009 by  
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It truly is amazing to wake up in the morning to the sound of birds twittering and chirping in the fresh dawn air. Bird calls are a language of their own and are carefully uttered to convey important messages. Bird sounds are a great form of communication as they can be heard even when the [...]

Identifying Birds

February 9, 2009 by  
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Bird watching involves identifying birds by their physical attributes as well as by their behavior. There are 9 points that can be used when identifying bird species – size, color, shape, bill (shape and color), leg (length and color), eye color, flight pattern, habitat and distribution. It is best to use a field guide for [...]

New Bio-Acoustic Technology A Boon For Conservationists

July 30, 2008 by  
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Most people are aware of the fact that years of pollution is taking its toll on our planet and the creatures on it, but when it comes to birds it is sometimes difficult to get an accurate estimate of exactly how badly particular species have been affected. That is all about to change, thanks to a new voice-recording method that has been developed specifically to assist bird conservationists.

Bird Brains Give Insight into Baby Babble

May 7, 2008 by  
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Scientists who have been searching for insight into how the brain learns motor tasks have had a new breakthrough. By studying the brains of both adult and juvenile songbirds, it has now been realized that there are two completely different brain circuits that are involved in the process.