Falsterbo Bird Show 2010

August 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

Three wonderful venues will be used to host the 2010 Falsterbo Bird Show from 3 to 5 September 2010, namely the Falsterbo Horse Show Arena, Nabben and Skanors Ljung. Over and above a host of exhibitors being present at the show, visitors to the Falsterbo Bird Show 2010 can look forward to bird ringing demonstrations, guided tours, raffles, lectures, daily walks and the ever popular Honey Buzzard Day activities. Various birding organizations have joined forces to ensure that the Falsterbo Bird Show is an event to remember.

To find out more about the show, is activities and schedule, visit the official website at http://www.falsterbobirdshow.se/Falsterbo_Bird_Show/Welcome_2.html.

Date: 3 – 5 September 2010
Venue: Various
City: Falsterbo
Country: Sweden

LAPC Young Bird Show 2010

August 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

The LAPC Young Bird Show is considered to be one of the most anticipated birding events on the West Coast calendar, and this year promises to be an even bigger event. With the Los Angeles Pigeon Club as the hosts of the show, visitors will be able to enjoy an entertaining show, and view some of the best pigeons in the industry. Owners will be showing of their most prized pigeons, and the show also serves as a vital networking opportunity.

It is an event that the entire family can participate in, and birding enthusiasts are encouraged not to miss out on the 2010 LAPC Young Bird Show.

Date: 12 September 2010
Venue: Irvine Regional Park
City: Orange, California
Country: United States of America

New Research into Bird Song

August 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Features

While zebra finch females utter single note, low-pitched calls, males have the ability to sing in a variety of frequencies, even producing a whistle that goes beyond a piano keyboard’s high end. Male birds make use of song to attract mates and to protect their territory. It is believed that the varied frequency of songs may be more attractive to females, as well as providing greater and more precise information.

The two variables affecting the pitch of a bird’s song are air pressure and muscle activity. Recent research has revealed that muscle activity plays the larger role in this respect. This study was conducted by Tobias Riede of the National Center for Voice and Speech (under the administration of the University of Utah), as well as Franz Goller, and John H. Fisher. Funding for the research was provided by the National Institutes of Health.

The zebra finch’s vocal organ is called the syrinx, and measures a mere one-eighth of an inch on either side. It was already known, through past studies, that male zebra finches had larger vocal muscles controlling the syrinx than did the females. In this study the cartilage scaffold, which supports the bird’s syrinx, as well as the “labia” (the part that oscillates when air moves through it) in the syrinx, were investigated. This revealed that the male finch’s cartilage scaffold is larger, while the labia are a different shape to that of the female. Riede concluded that this must be so that the labia can be tensioned tightly by the muscles that pull the scaffold, so as to reach the high-frequency notes.

The researchers sought to study whether lung pressure or vocal muscle strength was the more important factor in the control of the male zebra finch’s pitch. They began by recording the sounds of six male finches and six female finches for a period of two weeks. Tubes containing air pressure sensors were implanted into an air sac. Specially designed equipment ensured that the birds could continue to fly and sing freely whilst measurements were taken and their sounds recorded again. The results showed that higher air pressure lead to higher pitch, indicating that lung pressure does affect song frequency.

Following this experiment, the researchers cut the nerves that control the birds’ vocal muscles. They then recorded the birds’ sounds as they sang and flew about. It was noted that the pitch of all birds dropped to approximately the same level and males were unable to produce high frequencies. The fact that they could no longer put sufficient tension on the labia showed that the vocal muscles play a key role in bird song pitch.

Asian Bird Fair 2010

August 11, 2010 by  
Filed under Events

Bird watching groups from various countries, such as China, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines and Malaysia, was working together to host the first Asian Bird Fair on the 24th and 25th of September 2010. The fair will offer lectures and talks by well known delegates, and also take visitors on fascinating bird watching expeditions. It is a unique opportunity for bird watchers to get together and explore the world of birds locally and internationally.

Visit the Birdwatch website at http://www.birdwatch.ph/index.html for more information in regard to lectures, bird watching and the fair schedule.

Date: 24 – 25 September 2010
Venue: Waterfront Insular Hotel Davao
City: Davao
Country: Philippines

Rosellas Make Great Companions

August 10, 2010 by  
Filed under Pet Birds

Rosellas (genus Platycercus) can be found in the wild in various countries around the world, but are most commonly found in Australia. They tend to remain near the coast, inhabiting coastal plains and mountain regions, but can also be found in city parks and in the gardens of local residents. This beautiful and colorful parrot has also become popular as a pet bird, and there are a few facts and care requirements that future pet owners should be aware of before they decide to take on a Rosella as a new member of the household.

Growing to approximately thirty centimeters in size, Rosellas are one of the smaller parrot species. They are divided into two general groups, namely the white cheek and blue cheek group. Within these groups are various different Rosellas, such as the Tasmanian Eastern Rosella and the Golden Mantled Rosella that fall under the white cheek group, while the Crimson Rosella and the Adelaide Rosella are in the blue cheek group. They make wonderful pets as they have a lifespan of more than twenty years. Housing a Rosella in a metal cage or aviary is advisable, as they enjoy chewing on timber and wood. Cages and aviaries should also be large enough so the Rosellas are able to fly and get a certain amount of exercise. They do enjoy human companionship, but need a little freedom to enjoy a fulfilled life. A small bath is also recommended, as Rosellas enjoy bathing and playing in water.

These magnificent birds have a wide variety of dietary needs, so owners should be vigilant in offering their Rosellas more than just the usual mix of grey striped sunflower seeds, canary seeds and hulled oats. Rosellas also eat seeding grasses, berries, fruit and nectar, which are essential to their wellbeing. Breeding pairs should be kept on their own, as this will prevent the production of hybrids and birds should only be allowed to breed when they are between eighteen to twenty-four months old. Breeding pairs have been known to raise young until the age of ten years old. Over and above being spectacularly beautiful, Rosellas are very rewarding birds to have as pets. They are colorful companions and make wonderful additions to the family.

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